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A Harbinger in the heart of North Carolina

Lovely, isn’t it? We are thrilled to showcase this stunning Harbinger, built by one of our satisfied customers.

Where do we begin? That gorgeous lavender bathroom with the classic black & white tile? The perfect back porch? The bright and sunny loft area? If I had to guess, I’d say your eyes where probably drawn to the killer orange kitchen. Love it!
 

Here’s what the customer had to say about her Tumbleweed:

“Now that I’ve lived in the home for a few months, I can’t imagine needing anything bigger.  My neighbors, who have much larger homes, probably talk it up more than I do, and I never want for visitors who enjoy relaxing in my cozy living room or out on the deck.   There are plenty of small spaces to be had in my town, but few are single-family, energy-efficient homes.  I’m glad to have built a Tumbleweed from the ground up and to be able to live in a way that supports my values, particularly in a time when that can be so hard to do.”
 

 

 
Feast your eyes on all this small house goodness! The Harbinger is 404 square feet downstairs with a loft above. It is one of our nine cottages ranging from 261 square feet to 843 square feet. These cottages are designed to be built on a foundation and meet the International Building Code requirements. See all nine here.
 
See more images of the Harbinger here…

 

Photos by Daryl Shaw

See more images of the Harbinger here…
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  • Ff Minicooper

    Who is your builder ? Im looking to get this same house built in NC if I can can you give me some recommendations on how to start.

  • http://www.webzplus.com.au/ John Robinson

    I love the kitchen, can you please tell me what brand the oven/ stove is ? Thanks

  • DD

    I’m hoping to build the Harbinger in WV sometime this year. This will be ideal for me and a small farm I’m going to start up

  • helenhavlin

    I am 60 now and just learning about tiny homes; it will be some time before I can think about building one myself. I’m concerned about climbing a ladder to the loft at 65 or 70. Do any of your older tiny home dwellers have advice for me?

    • suzieQ

      I’m almost 70 and absolutely love these houses. I live in a 920 sq ft house now. I would love one of the tumbleweed homes but, like you, I can’t climb to the loft with my arthritis. I wish there were other options.

      • helenhavlin

        I suppose the only way these tiny homes work is to have a loft-bedroom? My arthritis isn’t too bad, it’s more that at our age a fall means a broken hip, and a broken hip means a long, slow, death from pneumonia!

        • zenloki

          my great grandmother fell and broke her hip when she was 86 and lived another 10 happy years. you could always put something soft (an air mattress) below the ladder before ascending. instead of a fall it’ll be your own private amusement.

        • Elicia

          There are many options for tiny homes. Some layouts have bedrooms on the ground floor.

        • Kathy Knight Potter

          I’ve looked at all the different houses and almost every house offers plans for a downstairs bedroom plan. No worries

    • Danie H

      You could always build the slightly bigger 1 bedroom version. It has a small bedroom on the main floor in addition to the loft, but the 1 bedroom Harbinger still comes in at a small 404 sq ft The studio/loft only version is 310 sq ft. There are 5 cottage styles under 500 sq ft. As far as the pull along styles you might look at the Popomo, which also features everything on one level.

      • helenhavlin

        That’s very helpful; thanks so much!

    • Dutchess0909

      hi helen, I am 67, same concerns and just moved into a new 470 sq foot mini chalet (Holland). I do have a low loft with three single beds and lots of storage. But my bed is on ground level, but is raised. I have six small Ikea drawers underneath, on wheels. I can roll each set of two completely out. My bedroom is also my office, long narrow desk, right next to my pillow :-). I have one wide step to get into and out of bed. Just right!

    • Bill Thorne

      You can tweak this design with a narrow staircase built into the wall next to where the ladder is–then have built-in storage under the staircase…it will be a bit steeper than traditional stairs but with as many railings as you want!

      • helenhavlin

        Great idea, Bill!

      • Jay Creighton

        Well maybe, but then again maybe not regarding the stairs. I think the reason the ladder moves is so it can be out of the way when not in use, but moved to the middle when needed. The reason for that is because the roof is low at the edges and high in the middle. If the stairs are at the edge then you will need to crawl into the room, not desirable. I also don’t think an elder would care much for a steep and narrow staircase. What you can do is choose the option that includes a first floor bedroom!

    • http://www.facebook.com/lauren.jones.501151 Lauren Jones

      There are ones I’ve seen all on one level built specifically for retirees. Keep searching, you’ll find them. Don’t know any names off hand. Sorry.

      • helenhavlin

        Thanks, Lauren!

    • Janis Fowler

      When I find someone local to build mine, I have a beautiful victorian day bed that will be my couch in the day and you sleep on it at night by removing the pillows. You put a twin mattress on it and can get one for your comfort. Mine also has the canvas spring platform and much softer than the old wood slats. I am 66 yrs old now and can climb stairs but there may come a time I won’t want to every night….besides we have to think about those bathroom runs during the night :)
      Also, these wood day beds have room under them for storage baskets or another twin bed that pulls out if you need it. I won’t use another bed but love the basket storage idea.

    • LuzVerdad

      Hi Helen – I love these little houses and hope to be living in one when I retire in 10 yrs. I was thinking maybe one of those companies that makes the stair-lift chairs could design or adapt one for these lovely little cottages. I saw the comment about the moving ladder and it makes sense not to hit one’s head or have to crawl if you already have arthritis. So, maybe the company could design a stair-lift that still slides from the center to the side and connected to the floor via a recessed track as well as connected to the edge of the loft like the ladder. The stair-lift company would have another market segment providing additional sales while the cottage company can sell to our baby-boomer age demographic which typically has the most discretionary income.

    • Juan Galeano

      I am planning on building one with a Murphy pull down bed. They are a little pricy but there is no way I want to be climbing into a loft!!!!

    • Kathryn Roman

      I had the same question and wondered if a person could do an old fashioned fold up into the wall unit? That would solve the space issue and provide the perfect option for not climbing the stairs or ladder. The loft could be outfitted with a conveyor type system or carrosel system so storage would be available up there as well without climbing.

    • Angela Jones

      There are some tiny homes that have a small bedroom on the ground floor and the loft can be used as a spare bedroom.

  • judith stoker

    Absolutely beautiful. We just bought a “big” three bedroom house at 900 sq.ft., but for a three bedroom, it seems like an awfully small house. It’s a total, total, renovation and we are using many ideas from your site. The kitchen here is right up our alley. Love those colors!

  • erecon67

    Love this!

  • Corey

    Those concerned with falling can get a simple suggestion for someone, myself, who is younger, but prone to falling going down and up “regular” stairs, while walking on brick side-walks, which is all that is in my neighborhood, and has a history of sleep walking off a top bunk of a bunk bed and breaking my collar bone years ago. No, I don’t need glasses, and yes, I seem to be a bit clumsier than the norm. Actually, I used to leave my bunk bed as a kid going backwards, meaning I would look down the ladder as I descended, I found it too unnerving to be looking over my shoulder while facing the ladder. Along with this, a few years back, my black lab Shiva (rest her soul) and I fell down about 20 steps if the “Brownstone” we resided in, and from that point on, I had to carry her, for the rest of life, up and down all stairs. Needless to say, I am not a fan if ladders or stairs but love the idea of a “tiny” home, with a loft. However, I would only use it for storage. Now a days, you can find very comfortable pull-out type beds, or couches that can be turned into a be. In the past, these were uncomfortable, ugly, bulky and would not be used as a nightly sleeping spot, unless you enjoyed back aches and muscle pain. Don’t give up the dream, because I am not! (btw, I Do Not work for any company that puts out the sleeping beds I spoke of or Tumble Weed or any other small or tiny home company. I just feel that with my many yrs of horrible experiences with both ladders and stairs, my suggestion may help someone to not at least look at an alternative to having a loft and sleeping in it in a tiny home). :)

  • Larry Brown

    I’ll be in Southern Pines, soon. Is this anywhere close by? I’d love to see one of these up close and in person! I could soooo live in one of these…

  • Kyle Mankes

    I really like the Tumbleweed homes, and this is certainly a beautiful home, but the math doesn’t add up. I live in Raleigh (mid-town area). Most homes in NC go for about $100 sq/ft for pre-built (including land), and about $130 sq/ft for something custom (not including land). This home was $200 sq/ft? One of the reasons I am interested in building a Tumbleweed is to save money and get out of debt. I’m interested in the B-53 with the add-on (884 sq/ft). (I’d go smaller, but I can’t seem to talk my wife into that idea . . . but that’s another story.) So, if 884 sq/ft x $200 sq/ft = $176,800 without land. That’s very high. Add in another $50,000 for land and you’re back up to an amount I don’t want to even think about. How can you keep costs down and not sacrifice quality? I don’t want to build my entire house from Habitat from Humanity, yard sales, and the odd Craigslist posting for lumber or something. If this was $100 sq/ft I could just about sell my wife on the idea tonight. At $200 sq/ft I might as well stay in my big old house because I’d just be trading one mortgage for another. Any thoughts or suggestions? I’m not trying to pee on anyone’s parade, I really do want helpful answers.

  • Kyle Mankes

    I really like the Tumbleweed homes, and this is certainly a beautiful
    home, but it seems very expensive. I live in Raleigh (mid-town area).
    Most homes in NC go for about $100 sq/ft for pre-built (including land),
    and about $130 sq/ft for something custom (not including land). This
    home was $200 sq/ft not including land? One of the reasons I am interested in building a
    Tumbleweed is to save money and get out of debt. I’m interested in the
    B-53 with the add-on (884 sq/ft). (I’d go smaller, but I can’t seem to
    talk my wife into that idea . . . but that’s another story.) So, if 884
    sq/ft x $200 sq/ft = $176,800 without land. That’s very high. Add in
    another $50,000 for land and you’re back up to an amount I don’t want to
    even think about. How can you keep costs down? I don’t want to build my entire house from Habitat from
    Humanity, yard sales, and the odd Craigslist posting for lumber or
    something. If this was $100 sq/ft I could just about sell my wife on the
    idea tonight. At $200 sq/ft I might as well stay in my big old house
    because I’d just be trading one mortgage for another. Any thoughts or
    suggestions?

    • Rolling Houses

      You have to adjust your thinking for it to make sense. I recommend reading the small house book if you haven’t already, it explains why these are so expensive per square foot compared to a normal sized house. A couple of excerpts from the book:

      “Square footage is really the cheapest thing that can be added onto a house. The electrical system, plumbing, heating, appliances and structural components of most any dwelling are similar in at least one key way. They are all expensive. This costly core is housed by the relatively cheap volume that surrounds it.”

      “I put the money saved on glitz and square footage into insulation, the reinforcement of structural elements, and detailing.”

      “At first glance, it appears that the more you buy the more you save, but it’s the hidden costs that get people into trouble. After all, more house than you need comes with more debt in total, more utility bills, more maintenance than you need and more foreclosures and more bailouts than any of us needs ever again.”

      • Tami Howard

        Rolling,
        Could you share the title and author of the book you refer to? Would love to read it!

  • ponerology

    Cute spaces but rather sad that so many people now live alone rather than with family/extended family for support.

  • 최근

    와우~~나무 그대로도 좋지만 페인트 색상도 새롭네요 좋아요

  • Sue

    I absolutely LOVE Tiny Houses and this one is probably the nicest I’ve seen. Excellent colour choices. Love the appliances and décor! I turn 62 in a few weeks and am starting to get a plan together for my eventual ‘retirement’ home. I would probably go for this plan as is, with the idea of ‘moving downstairs’ should I become ancient & decrepit. I’ve always dreamed of living out my dotage in a quaint cottage by the seaside, but the reality is I don’t have a cool half mil in my back pocket. These tiny houses are just the ticket. I was also thinking I could build one on wheels and then spend 3 months of the year with each of my four kids. HAHA! Pull up, park in the back 40……Mama’s here! Vengeance.

  • Dale Adams

    I am a homebuilder in Dallas and think these houses would be ideal for a guest house for family or VRBO rental. What is the cost per foot to build this model and how many square feet is it?

  • LN

    Hi Carol ,my neighborhood in N.C. Allows tiny houses in certain sections. Contact me via email for info if u like. Risingstar25attheyahoo

  • Dana B.

    I am looking forward to applying my skills and training as an interior designer, organizer and stager to designing a tiny home on wheels and a tiny cottage. I’ve been intrigued with tiny structures and follies for four decades. I’m exploring the option of using a “Japanese step tonsu” design for a tiny cottage. They’ve been used historically in Asian countries as stairs to access lofts, as well as to provide storage. I am older as well, and not inclined to climb a ladder. I am attending the workshop in Portland soon and will bring this option up for discussion.

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