Google

A Big Solution for Tiny Houses

Building codes currently prevent us from building a house as small as we want to. We drove around that problem 12 years ago by putting the first Tumbleweed Tiny House on wheels. Now we’re parking our tiny houses squarely within building and zoning codes with our new nationally certified ready-made units.  Our houses meet over 500 safety codes of electrical, plumbing, construction, heating and fire safety.

Just like your neighbors in regular homes, you can get conventional financing and insurance on your certified Tumbleweed. We all know that the average house costs a fortune, but a Tumbleweed can be had for as little as $400 per month – and paid off in half the time of a conventional mortgage.

linden-rvia-bridge-road-600

Attention to detail is still the hallmark in every hand crafted home built in our licensed Colorado facility. These days they’re also inspected and tested to meet over 500 safety and building code regulations (ANSI 119.5 and NFPA 1194) – and yeah, this house can still travel anywhere!

The small house movement is a real solution to our current housing crisis, and now there is a clear path to achieve home ownership. The door is open wide, come on in!

Want to learn more about how this works and what type of home we can build for you? Schedule a free consult by clicking here and finding a time that works for you.

 

Share
  • Ellen Muller Brady

    Any suggestions for those of us who have purchased Tumbleweed plans and built our own houses as far as getting it certified on our own?

    Thanks for any help you can offer!
    Ellen

    • Pookies von Hassen

      Ellen,
      I’ve looked into this matter a few times, and (and this is just based on what I can find, so your mileage may vary) getting your own tiny house certified means acquiring a permit to build RVs. It seems that this is really just a matter of filling out a form and paying a fee; but which form, where, with who, and how much, I couldn’t discern. It would be nice if Tumbleweed shared this process with us, but I could see why they wouldn’t, as well; it’s one of their main selling points on the pre-built houses.

    • Tumbleweed_Tiny_House_Company

      Great question Ellen. In order to build a certified house, you would need to become a certified manufacturer. Anyone with a facility can apply with RVIA, but there is no guarantee you’ll be approved. The license is really designed for businesses who are building many homes. It isn’t really intended for personal use, and probably isn’t practical on a cost and time basis.

      Our facility goes through regular inspections and the inspectors are observing the houses under construction, our testing and safety methods, our record keeping, and quizzing us on the rules to make sure we know our stuff.

      If you’d like to discuss your options in greater detail, sign up for a free consult with us here: http://tumbleweedhouses.appointy.com/

    • America Curl

      I drove mine to the Arizona DMV and they registered it as a travel trailer. I had to show proof that the plumbing and electrical work was completed by a certified contractor, and they checked the VIN number for the trailer. Took maybe and hour or so. Then I took the new title, the contractor documents and my receipts and it was insured for the estimated cost of $27,000.

  • Lisa Jahn Haight

    So exciting! I, like Ellen, also would like to know if there is anything those of us who bought plans and want to build our own tiny home can do to get it certified.

  • Erik Blair

    This is great news!!!!

  • Pingback: Now You Can Get Loans for Tumbleweed Tiny Houses | Tiny House Pins

  • Pamela Bockman

    Great news! Thank you!

  • Ressie Fry

    That is so awesome!

  • David

    This is major good news! Opens a lot of doors for us… thanks

  • Brodie Hartford

    Ya know, at first glance this seemed like a great idea. After some
    thought however, it seems more like being steered back to the concept of
    living in a debt prison once again. Once again having to conform to the
    criteria of banks and insurance corporations, following all their rules
    and leaving one’s self open to be met with “sorry but you don’t qualify” or “no you can’t build it like that’ or ‘heat it like that’ or ‘locate it there’ or ‘put that kind of siding on it’ ” ect.ect. I am in the process
    of building my own. I am on a pension due to an injury which limits my
    ability to make the kind of income I used to make. Yet, like many who
    built these already, with some creative thinking and a willingness to
    pulls some nails and re-purpose some material it can be done for a
    fraction of the $20-50k they are advertised for. The reason I decided this route is because of how unattached
    this is from the political and financial institutions (with their
    constant attempts to get us to hook ourselves onto their leash) and the
    subsequent freedom it inherently offers. I can see this being the first step to having this movement join the ranks of the fully regulated way of living we who do this are seeking to detach from.

    • Rick Davis

      You make some good points but I don’t think that is their intension. I build my first “tiny house” back in the early 90′s before I heard of Tumbleweed. Many campgrounds would not let me in. I solved the problem by purchasing a truck camper and putting it on my pickup. I think that the certificate would be a good thing for some people but I can see where some people would not need it or want it.

      • Brenda Myers

        WHY WOULD CAMP GROUNDS NOT ALLOW YOU IN? I’M IN AR. IF WE LIVE OUTSIDE CITY LIMITS WE CAN BUILD ANYTHING, WE EVEN CONNECTED THE WIRING TO THIS BIG HOUSE ALL THE ELECTRIC COMPANY DID WAS SAY” LOOK’S GOOD TO ME, PUT SOME WIRES ON THE OTHER SIDE TO PULL POLE OTHER DIRECTION IN CASE WE GET A LOT OF ICE

    • Brenda Myers

      I AGREE 100% W/ YOU ON THIS- NOW I DO OWN A HOME FREE & CLEAR; IT IS AS YOU STATED; SUBSEQUENT FREEDOM IT OFFERS. I ALREADY HAVE THE TRAILER-I AS WELL HAVE 2 BARNS OF LUMBER. I EVEN LIVE JUST A FEW MILES FROM A MANUFACTURE OF METAL ROOFING WHICH LAST A LIFETIME. I DO NOT NEED TO SPEND 20,00- 50,000 NOPE- NOT ME. I WILL TELL YOU SOMETHING WHICH WILL SET YOU EVEN FURTHER APPART. IT IS NOT AS COSTLY AS I HAD FIRST THOUGHT- SOLAR POWER-NEVER HAVE A POWER BILL AGAIN. THE UNIT WHICH WILL RUN A HUGE FRIDGE COST $3,000 THEN FOR $250.00 YOU GET {8 }MORE PANELS WHICH WOULD BE ENOUGH FOR US TO HEAT & COOL WHOLE PLACE ALL YR. IT IS A SHOW I WATCHED “PREPERS”, ONE COUPLE HAD ALL SOLOAR POWER, END OF THE YEAR THEY ALWAYS HAVE LEFT OVER ELECTRIC WHICH THEY RESALE TO THE ELECTRIC COMPANY. IMAGINE NO ELECTRIC BILL EVER AGAIN. NO JOKE THIS IS REAL -THEY ARE TOTALLY SELF EFFICIENT. ONLY THING THEY PAY FOR CABLE T.V. NO WAY I WOULD GO N DEBT WHEN I CAN BUILD IT. I KNOW THINGS HAVE TO BE WELL THOUGHT OUT. SOLAR NO ELECTRIC OUTAGE-NO BILL-EVER. I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A WOMAN PEOPLE WOULD SAY CANT DO THIS OR THAT. PROVED THEM WRONG TIME AFTER TIME. MY CAMPER ALREADY HAS TAGS-LIFETIME. WEL-COME COMMENTS.

    • bettaboy

      This is a link to the actual cost of any house tiny or else wise. I post this only as the actual cost is well above 60k.

      Most of what you pay is enormous interest – This is for a higher value.

      <>

  • Nick Stein

    I’d rather have a small payment on something I could own than have a rent payment on something I’d never own. But of course, I have questions, like how much interest are we talking here. No matter though, I’d just do like I do with my car…make weekly payments and pay more than the minimum each month. Try and “interest me now!” Ha!

    As far as certification goes, I agree with the skepticism shared earlier, it could be a step in the wrong direction. But, if it opens the door to being able to get them parked in more places, I’m for it. Where I live, in Los Angeles, it would be hard to not get bothered for staying in one of these. The sad thing is, that housing here is so unreal that most people would love to live like this. They could easily open up some old industrial yard, clean it up, and make a tiny house park there, or allow you to park it on some lot near the beach…

    It seems today the system would rather have you pay till death, never own anything, and live uncomfortably, or complain about you living in a van on their streets or sleeping on their front stoop. The problem here is that it’s nearly impossible for many to realize this dream. This is a step (for that reason) in the right direction. It’s funny that nobody realizes that you don’t have to live this way forever, but you may have a lot more down and live in a house much more to your means when you do upgrade. I think the problem is people want their biggest house of their life fresh out of college…

    • Tumbleweed_Tiny_House_Company

      The interest on RV loans tend to be about 1 or 2% higher than a standard house mortgage. Typically they last 15 years.

      It’s important to differentiate the skepticism between financing and certification. The two aren’t necessarily related. And the certification is a good thing no matter how we look at it. Suppose you do have $60,000 in cash and want to buy a tiny home but you want to make sure it’s easy to insure. Now that path is clear and easy.

      And we’ve talked to so many people who aren’t in a position to build by themselves and don’t have the opportunity to save enough to buy one (let alone the materials). Instead, they are stuck paying rent. Now they have the option of buying a tiny home and paying off “their mortgage” rather than paying off the landlords mortgage

      • Jackie Mousseau

        This isn’t for people who can’t get into a “regular” house due to no down payment or credit issues. You have to get a bank loan and they’re not lending unless your credit score is in the upper 700′s and up. So….how does this help the “little guy” again?

        Also, to park this “house” in an RV park, you’d have to find one that have year round availabllity.

        • Jennifer Smith

          This is a strange comment to me. There are many many parts of the country where you could not buy a garage let alone a home for $50k. Why do you have to get a bank loan? I have a cc with a $80, 000 limit. Not that I am suggesting using that. Relatives perhaps? I agree many “institutions” want to see a good credit score but really if you were going to lend money to someone what would you look for as a true indicator that you would pay off your loan? Think about the reality of that statement. Perhaps you have been employed for 20 years and your employer would consider giving you a loan and taking the payment out of your paycheck. Just a few ideas and thoughts.

          Also, you do not need to live in an RV park. You can park your tiny home on someone’s property, or purchase a piece of property etc.You would just need to research possible zoning restrictions. I live in someone’s driveway and pay $450 a month to park my RV. I am within walking distance of many stores and restaurants and cafes.

          • Tracey Walker

            Actually, a few years ago, I was able to get a car loan even though I couldn’t get a credit card. The car company told me it is easier, because a car is something that can be taken from you if you don’t pay up. They have built in collateral. I imagine that getting an RV loan for a tiny house would be far easier than getting a home loan.

          • Gale Moorman

            Hello Jennifer, that sounds great parking a RV or tiny house on someone’s property or driveway and pay $450/mo. Like to know how you get your electric and water? Thanks.

        • CandideThirtythree

          It doesn’t help the little guy, this is not for poor people. You have to pay $400-$500 a month for the tiny house then a few hundred more to park it and insure it and pay utilities so it turns out costing more than rent or a house note.

          If you already have a good job, so good that you can borrow $50k from the boss or have a credit card with an $80k limit and family that is well off enough to own their own property large enough for you to park it on then you are not poor.

          This is for well off people who want a different lifestyle, maybe move out to the country where land is only $400 an acre and you can grow organic beets and raise chickens. That still costs lots of money to get started but you don’t have to worry about any codes as long as you don’t have the power company hook power to it.

          The way to get around codes is buy a few acres out in the wilderness, put up solar panels, drill a water well and make a drying bed or oxidation pond for sewerage.

          If the land is out in farm country, you can build a canopy for hay storage and the power company will put up a meter. Then you just park your tiny house and plug it in.

          The down side is you will have to drive a long way to a store or hospital not to mention work.

          • bettaboy

            You are so correct – I am on ssd of about now 900 a month. Building fire in NYC where (3,500 violations) I later learned Government agencies, so on meant nothing. I was working on my Masters NYU in
            health care and lost it all. (and already had a 100k position in place – a drastic life change I can say, lol)

            Most of those with what I have labeled MCS but I prefer chemical injury (background in biology, other sciences, arts and arts chemistry, and holistic nutrition) are
            living in tents, cars, and if not dead, suffering greatly.

            Even the so called “tiny home” (my mothers farm house in update NYC was as small as these homes, lol) (as were most all homes back then btw) are not even applicable for those with chemical injury (due to the materials used) and not good for anyone really.

            I am stunned by the price tag – a person, if mobile can go to many areas of America – even areas where outstanding architecture and churches so on are being
            demolished or sold for far less then these (much as when in NYC under Mayor Koch one could buy buildings for one buck – now worth a fortune).

            So now one can acquire one at above market mortgage rates to pay it down for ages (most of which is interest)…

            PS.
            I lived in S. Oregon much of my life – I had friends already off the grid, solar (before it was even heard of much), wind, organic gardens – nothing new but the price TAG is beyond measure and as you stated now
            not for the “poor”.

            Although as others state, it depends on ones area, and local cost (all too high – it is a rigged game in the end) but for the truly “poor” it is not a solution.

    • DeWhit

      It seems to me that one would finally get tired of trying to fight the system in large metropolitan area’s such as Los Angeles and either play the game by their rules OR move out to another location with a different set of rules that would allow one to own their own home.

      It is a choice. There is a price to pay for life in the big city.

      Tiny trailer homes would be a nightmare for the current Los Angeles area and create more problems than it solves.

  • http://www.rebannford.com/ Rebecca Ford

    Like a few others have already expressed, I think this is a great idea! I’m glad to hear, and am anxious to hear more.

  • Nancy Chisholm

    I h

  • Nancy Chisholm

    I have been waiting for this day when financing would be an option for those who want to buy a tiny home already built and ready to go …it certainly is cheaper than homes on the market ..i like the simplicity but am not able to build it on my own ..i am hoping in a few years to buy one …a dream come true.

  • Ryan

    As long as you have reasonable credit, you should be able to get an RV loan. Don’t go to the big banks looking for credit- check out your local credit unions. Often they have more lax lending standards and lower rates as well.

    You should be able to get credit if you look around enough, but if your credit is less than excellent, you will suffer from higher interest rates. The good news, though, is that if you work on improving your credit score you can always refinance and enjoy a lower rate. It’s better than nothing.

    When I was younger I didn’t have a lot of credit, and my credit score was less than excellent. I needed a car. I had to accept a 14% car loan! I had that for about two years, and during that time I improved my credit substantially. I went to a local credit union and was able to refinance for 1.99%, saving me 100$ a month on interest!

    This is a bit off topic, but financing is out there if you want it badly enough.

    Cottages

    bodega loring nv
    harbinger Whidbey sebastarosa
    enesti b53 zglass
  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments